West Nile Virus

West Nile Virus

What is the West Nile Virus? The West Nile virus is a mosquito-borne zoonotic arbovirus. It belongs tp the genus Flavivirus in the family Flaviviridae. This flavivirus is found in the temperate and tropical regions of the world. This particular virus was first identified in the West Nile subregion in Uganda during 1937. Since 1937 and the mid-1990s, the West Nile virus occurred sporadically. During that time it was considered to be a minor risk for humand but an outbreak un Algeria during 1994 changed…

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Virus replication

Virus replication

Virus Replication process: The virus replication process is very interesting and complex at the same time. Viruses are dependent on their host cells for replication. There are six stages of the virus replication process in its life cycle. Attachment. This is the intermolecular binding between viral capsid proteins and receptors on the outer membrane of the host cell. The details of the binding process will determine the host species and cell types that are receptive to viral infection. This mechanism is believed to have evolved…

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Bacteria Metabolism

Bacteria Metabolism

Bacteria shows an extremely wide variety of bacteria metabolism types. The distribution of metabolic traits within the different groups of bacteria have generally been used to define their taxonomy. These traits often do not correspond with modern genetic classifications. These are the types of bacteria metabolism: Nutritional type Source of energy Source of carbon Phototrophs Sunlight Organic compounds or cabon fixation. Lithotrops Inorganic compounds Organic compounds. Organotrophs Organic compounds Organic compounds or carbon fixation The carbon metabolism in bacteria is ether heterotrphic or autotrophic. Heterottrophic…

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Fungal Diversity

Fungi Diversity

Fungi Diversity Fungi are present worldwide and they can grow in a wide range of habitats. Some of them grow in extreme environments such as deserts, areas with high salt concentrations or ionizing radiation. Some even grow in deep sea sediments. Some fungi have shown the ability to survive intense UV and cosmic radiation encountered in space. Most fungi grow in terrestrial environment even though several species live partly or solely in aquatic habitats. One example of of an aquatic fungi is the chytrid fungus…

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Bacteria Morphology

Bacteria Morphology

Bacteria has a very wide diversity of shapes and sizes. These are referred to as the bacteria morphology. Bacteria cells are about 1/10 the size of eukaryotic cells and they are generally between 0.5 and 5.0 micrometers in length. A few species are up to half a millimeter long and they are visible to the naked eye. Among the smallest bacteria, there are those that measure 0.3 micrometers as well as the largest viruses. Microbiologists claim that there are bacteria that are smaller but these…

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Viral Genome

Viral Genome

Viral Genome: A viral genome can be a variety of genomic structures that can be seen among viral species. As a group, they contain more diversity than plants, animals, archaea or bacteria. There are millions of different viruses and we haven’t even discovered all of them yet. Today, roughly 5 000 of these viruses were studied in great detail. A virus either has a DNA or an RNA genome. The two main types is the RNA and DNA virus, which is (as you’ve guessed t),…

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Types of protozoa

There are various types of protozoa that people hardly know about. What are their purpose? What do they actually do? Look at our protozoa taxonomy, protozoa structure and our protozoa explanation to learn more. Types of protozoa: Protozoa are classified according to the ways in which they move about. One phylum (the Sarcodina), moves by pushing out portions of their cytoplasm forming pseudopods (“false feet”) in order to propel them forward. They capture their food by extending their pseudopods around it, engulfing it, and digesting…

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Bacteria vs Virus

Bacteria vs virus is a mix characteristics and differences. Each virus is different from each bacteria. What do we know about the differences? How can we explain it? It’s simple. All of the differences of bacteria vs virus will be explained. Definitions Bacteria Virus Bacteria are unicellular organisms. They are typically a few micrometers long. The differences in shapes vary greatly and they include curved rods, spheres, rods and spirals. A virus is a sub-microscopic particle. They can infect the host of a biological organism.…

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Bacteria Metabolism

Pathogenic bacteria

Pathogenic bacteria are bacteria that cause bacterial infection. Most bacteria are harmless, beneficial or pathogenic. Various diseases such as tuberculosis is causes by pathogenic bacteria. Diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria. Each pathogenic species has a few characteristics with interactions related to humans. Conditionally pathogenic. conditionally pathogenic bacteria only become pathogenic if certain conditions are met. These may vary according to your immune system and injuries. Intracellular. Other organisms  may also cause diseases in humans. Obligate intracellular parasites are able to grow and reproduce only within…

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Evolution of fungi

Why the evolution of fungi? The evolution of fungi has been researched for decades. Just like animals and plants, we have studied their evolutionary path through genetic analysis. The evolution of fungi. The evolution of fungi has been going on since fungi diverged from other life around 1,500 million years ago. The glomaleans branched out from the “higher fungi” at ~570 million years ago. This is based on DNA analysis. Fungi most-likely colonised the land during the Cambrian era. From today, that’s over 500 million…

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