Can you live without bacteria?

Can you live without bacteria?

The idea that you have millions of bacteria on your skin and inside of you, can give anyone the creeps. The fact is that humans cannot live without carbon, nitrogen, defenses against disease and the ability to digest food. This means that we can’t live without bacteria. Most people think of bacteria in the context of disease so they don’t think about the good bacteria, only the bad ones. Recycling On land and sea, bacteria are major contributors in the decomposition of organic matter and…

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Ecological importance of Protozoa

Ecological importance of Protozoa

The major important role in the ecology of protozoa is its role in food chain. Many aquatic animals feed on protozoa which of course helps them to survive. Protozoa helps to control the population of bacteria as well as other protozoans by feeding on them. Controlling the population of other organism is important so that the ecological balance and diversity remains in check. Like bacteria, aquatic and terrestrial protozoa speed up the decomposition of any dead plants and animals. Decomposition is a very important process…

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How does your body fight off a virus?

How does your body fight off a virus?

Viruses and micro-organisms that are infectious but they do require a living host in order to survive and replicate. When a virus enters your body, it invades and assumes control of cells and redirects them to produce more of the virus. How do our bodies defend us from viruses? When our bodies are under attack from a viral infection, they form a defense known as the immune respone. Our immune system is designed to recognise the cells that make up our bodies and to attack…

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Characteristics of Protozoa

Characteristics of Protozoa

Characteristics of protozoa Protozoa are usually between 10 and 52 micrometers in length but they can grow as large as 1 mm. The largest protozoa are known as deep-sea dwelling xenophyphores and they can grow as large as 20 cm in diameter. They were considered to be part of the protista. Protozoa exist throughout aquatic environments and soil. Protozoa occupy a range of throphic levels. They are eukaryotic unicellular and aquatic organisms that can be flagellates, ciliates and amoebas. Motility and digestion Tulodens are two…

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Fungi growth and physiology

Fungi growth and physiology

The growth of fungi as hyphae on or in solid substrates or as a single cell in aquatic habitats is ddapted for the extraction of nutrients in an efficient manner. This is because growth forms have a high surface to volume ratio. Hyphae are specifically adapted for growth on solid surfaces and they are also adapted to invade a structure called an appressorium that evolved to puncture plant tissues. The pressure that’s generated by the appressorium. can exceed 1 200 psi. All of this pressure…

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Virus replication cycle

Virus replication cycle

Viruses can’t grow through cell division because they are acellular. They use the machinery and metabolism of a host cell to create multiple copies of themselves while their copies assemble in the host cell. Attachment It is a specific biding between viral capsids and specific receptors on the host cellular surface. This criteria will determine the host range of a virus. This mechanism favor those viruses that infect only the cells in which they are able to replicate. When a virus attaches itself to the…

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Firmicutes

Firmicutes

Firmicutes are a division of bacteria and most of them are Gram-positive. Some of them won’t react to gram-staining, while others show up as gram-negative. Originally, Firmicutes were taken to include all Gram-positive bacteria but recently, they are restricted to a core group of relatcci or rod-shaped forms. Many Firmicutes produce endospores which are resistant to desiccation and enables them to survive extreme conditions. They are located in various environments, and some dangerous pathogens. The group is typically divided into the Clostridia (anaerobic), Bacilli (obligate…

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Differences between good and bad bacteria

Differences between good and bad bacteria

The human body comes into contact with good and bad bacteria on a daily basis. To bacteria, our bodies are a great environment wand a major source of nutrients. Beneficial bacteria helps us in various ways or the harmful bacteria that makes us sick. Without beneficial bacteria, we would probably wither away and die. Percentage of bacteria Our bodies are actually dependent on bacteria. A healthy body and digestive system would have 85% beneficial bacteria and 15% harmful bacteria. When this balance is disturbed, we…

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Social Intelligence of Bacteria

Social Intelligence of Bacteria

Bacteria have developed very complex communication skills to cooperatively self-organize themselves into highly structure colonies that can adapt to just about any environment. Microbiologists also proposed that bacteria use their intracellular flexibility that involves signal transduction networks and genomic plasticity to collectively maintain their linguistic communication with each other. Bacteria was always seen as simple creatures but now, they are recognized to be intelligent? Is that even possible? Yes. Studies have shown that bacteria can conduct highly complex social activities by using a sophisticated chemical…

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DNA Virus

DNA Virus

What is a DNA virus? All viruses can be classified based on the proteins encoded within the viral genetic material or genome. Viruses with deoxyribonucleic acid genomes are called DNA viruses. DNA viruses are small when they are compared tithe cells they infect and they are obligate intracellular parasites. This means that they are parasites which  can only replicate within cells. How does a DNA virus work? When the appropriate cell is entered, DNA viruses can program the cell to replicate the viruses using genes…

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